Astronauts Have Brain   They Return to Earth

Changes Even Months After

The latest evaluation of

 microgravity's warping effect on our biology focuses on the spaces surrounding the blood vessels that weave through our brain

Researchers from across the US 

compared a series of MRI scans of 15 astronaut brains taken prior to a six-month stay on the International Space Station, and up to six months after their return

Using algorithms to carefully assess

 the sizes of perivascular spaces the team found time spent in orbit had a profound effect on the brain's plumbing. For the first-timers, at least.

Among the pool of veteran astronauts,

there appeared to be little difference in the sizes of perivascular spaces in the two scans taken prior to the mission and the four taken after.

 The findings might not be

there appeared to be little difference in the sizes of perivascular spaces in the two scans taken prior to the mission and the four taken after.

Previous studies on brain

tissues and their fluid volumes have found they're slow to recover from a stint in space, with some changes persisting for a year or more.

 Right now, astronauts rarely

make more than a few trips into space in their lifetime, typically hanging around for roughly six months at a time.